ADVERTISING ON BLOCKCHAIN

Advertisers and brands are increasingly losing patience with ad agencies and other players over the lack of transparency in the digital advertising space. Digital ad revenue for the first half of 2017 came in at a record $40 billion, up from $31 billion for the previous year, and it was estimated to have reached $85 billion by the end of 2017.

The fight for transparency intensified in 2017 after The Times of London published a report about how the ads of big brands were appearing alongside racist videos on the giant video platform YouTube. Several brands paused their spending on YouTube advertising temporarily, until YouTube reassured them that it had taken measures to correct the issue.

The issue with YouTube speaks to the larger theme of a lack of transparency in the space. There isn’t enough information at the disposal of the advertiser regarding what they’re buying and how much they’re paying for viewed ads. Duracell, furious after finding out how much of its money goes to hidden fees compared to the actual amount it spent on ads, built its own advertising audit system, whereby it relates directly with a demand-side ad platform and a brand safety vendor-all in a bid to be more informed of its advertising moves. Simply put, advertisers are looking for a more transparent way to connect with their customer and audience.

How does traditional ad buying work?

Typically, the advertiser -the brand that’s looking to connect with its audience-contracts a digital ad agency to manage its entire ad campaign, with the advertiser having a set target it aims to achieve from the campaign. The advertiser pays the ad agency an amount that would cover both the overall cost of creating ad content and the cost of distributing the ad content to the brand’s target audience/customers. These two types of costs are what digital media experts call non-working and working spend respectively. One thing to note here is that an ad agency’s overhead cost is also part of the non-working spend.

Once the ad agency has developed the content for the desired channels, it buys ad spaces also called ad inventories -where the desired audiences would see the content. The ad agency has two options for buying ad spaces: buying directly from the publisher and buying programmatically through an ad exchange platform.

This usually long process fosters a lack of transparency-hidden fees, fraud, traffic, measurement and view ability especially with programmatic media buying. For clarity, the transparency issues here can be broken into two main parts:

  1. Fees and charges from vendors and other players along the supply chain.
  2. Fraud and view ability.

The first part is fostered by the long nature of the programmatic ad supply chain, as shown;

With each arrow in the image above, you can think of ad dollars being transferred diminishingly. And in many situations, the advertiser isn’t aware of how much each player in this system takes. According to a report from the ad industry trade group IAB, 55% of programmatic ad revenue goes to ‘ad tech’ services, while publishers receive only 45%. The findings from IAB demonstrate that non-working ad spend (ad dollars that didn’t get to the publisher) cost advertisers more than working spend. There are two problems here. First, advertisers don’t usually receive sufficient information about these costs.

The second problem is that publishers, who actually provide the platform for brands to reach their audiences, are paid less than the intermediaries.

The ad fraud and view ability part of the overall transparency issues originate from publishers selling fake impressions (fake clicks and bot traffic). Domain spoofing, whereby a publisher somehow presents his domain to be a larger publisher’s domain, is another part of the fraud problem. Ad fraud reportedly cost the U.S. advertising industry about $6.5 billion in 2017. Again, as in the case of hidden fees, sufficient information on how publishers verify their traffic, and the processes that ad agencies and other intermediaries follow to ensure that they work with publishers with verified traffic, needs to be available to everyone within the ecosystem.

This is where blockchain comes in. Indeed, blockchain in advertising is likely to be where we’ll see the most rapid adoption. They are a match made in heaven. Advertising lacks the transparency of data and process. Blockchain offers the transparency of data and process.

Decentralizing E-Commerce (PART 1)

Blockchain is a technology that makes it possible to build applications where multiple parties can record transactions without the need for a trusted, central authority to ensure that transactions are verified and secure (Merkle 1979). It enables this by establishing a peer-to-peer network where each participant in the network has access to a shared ledger where the transactions are recorded. These transactions are by design, immutable and independently verifiable.

However, the sector it will transform, and have the highest impact on day to day consumer and seller activities, is the e-commerce industry. The e-commerce industry has arguably changed the way we shop and live, which to many people has basically become one and the same.

The convenience, affordability, and vast array of products offered by e-commerce platforms shows some of the benefits of the e-commerce industry.  With the growth of the industry large e-commerce companies like Amazon, Alibaba, EBay and a large group of other companies which account for over 50% of that market valuation. However, problems associated with e-commerce are beginning to emerge.

Despite its evident popularity and market penetration, e-commerce has drawbacks. Most of these relate to the centralization of marketplace platforms and the size of the corporations behind them. Some of these problems relate to payments, supply chain management, data security, transparent marketplace, satisfied retailers, efficient management systems, and satisfied consumers. The current e-commerce architecture will have a hard time resolving all these issues in one fell swoop, with the best solution to these problems is blockchain technology.

PROBLEMS OF THE MARKET

Fees

Sellers are typically required to pay high commission fees, but have little choice if they want to access the large audience that the top e-commerce platforms enjoy. Fees can run to 20% in some cases. There is also credit card or payment processor fees to factor in. PayPal, for example, typically charges around 3%. All of these have to be included in the price and passed on to the consumer.

Gatekeepers

With conventional e-commerce, the platform and company behind it act as gatekeepers who limit contact between buyer and seller. Merchants struggle to build a long-term relationship with customers. The marketplace company does not want them trading outside of its e-commerce platform. Communication is often restricted, or takes place within strict parameters. The platform is able to view any messages exchanged between buyer and seller.

Use of personal information

Every large online service harvests extensive personal data from its users and monetizes it in various ways. Uses of such personal data ranges from tailored advertising through to selling it or sharing it with third parties.  In attempt to overcome this problem, the European Union signed the General Data Protection Regulation(EU) 2016/679 (“GDPR”). It is a regulation in EU law on data protection and privacy for all individuals within the European Union (EU) and the European Economic Area (EEA). It also addresses the export of personal data outside the EU and EEA areas. The GDPR aims primarily to give control to individuals over their personal data and to simplify the regulatory environment for international business by unifying the regulation within the EU. Additionally, data breaches are an all-too-common occurrence. Personal data has been called the oil of the internet, and its value makes it a popular target for hackers. Although GDPR has somewhat improved matters, in many jurisdictions, the laws around data use are far less clear. There may be no straightforward procedure for how companies should act in the case of a data breach, and they may not tell their customers that their personal information has been compromised for months, if ever. In short, data loss has gone from being an embarrassment or inconvenience for a company to little more than the price of doing business.

 

BLOCKCHAIN AND CRYPTO CURRENCY IN KENYA

Hope you  guys got to tune in on Blockchain and Crypto currency in Kenya  @ebrutvkenya.

If you didn’t, do not despair, you can click on the link and enjoy.

Meanwhile, what’s your questions or concerns on crypto currency? Let’s unpack them at our UBRICA CRYPTOFEST  on September 21-22 at the Leleshwa Getaway. Registration is open

LEGALITY OF SMART CONTRACTS

To understand what smart contracts are, we first define what a contract is. A Contract is a written or spoken agreement, especially one concerning employment, sales, or tenancy, which is intended to be enforceable by law. The essentials necessary to create a valid contract include:

  • Offer
  • Acceptance
  • Consideration
  • Mutual obligation
  • Capacity
  • Intention to create a legal relationship

These formal contracts are carried out by people and they have set the terms and conditions for the contract.

Smart contracts are self-executing contracts with the terms of the agreement between buyer and seller being directly written into lines of code. The code and the agreements contained therein exist across a distributed, decentralized blockchain network. Smart contracts can also be defined as agreements wherein execution is automated, usually by computers. Such contracts are designed to ensure performance without recourse to the courts. Automation ensures performance, for better or worse, by excising human discretion from contract execution.

Smart contracts were first proposed in 1994 by Nick Szabo, an American computer scientist who invented a virtual currency called “Bit Gold” in 1998, fully 10 years before the invention of Bitcoin.

The phrase and concept of smart contracts was developed by Szabo with the goal of bringing what he calls the highly evolved practices of contract law and practice to the design of electronic commerce protocols between strangers on the Internet. Smart contracts are a major feature of cryptocurrency and the programming language.

Szabo defined smart contracts as computerized transaction protocols that execute terms of a contract. He wanted to extend the functionality of electronic transaction methods, such as POS (point of sale), to the digital realm.

These contracts help you exchange money, property, shares, or anything of value in a transparent, conflict-free way while avoiding the services of a middleman.

The best way to describe smart contracts is to compare the technology to a vending machine. Ordinarily, you would go to a lawyer or a notary, pay them, and wait while you get the document. With smart contracts, you simply drop a bitcoin into the vending machine (i.e. ledger), and your escrow, driver’s license, or whatever drops into your account. More so, smart contracts not only define the rules and penalties around an agreement in the same way that a traditional contract does, but also automatically enforce those obligations.

The key properties of smart contracts are:

  • Autonomy
  • Decentralization
  • Auto-sufficiency

Autonomy implies that after a smart contact launches, the deal initiator does not have to participate any more in the process. Smart contracts are not focused on one central server but are distributed by various network points so they can be referred to as being decentralized. Auto-sufficiency supposes that contracts are able to collect money, realize transactions, distribute resources, issue and spend funds to allow a larger capacity of storage and computation power.

Having understood what smart contracts are, we now address the potential legal implications the contract has on the parties. For a normal written contract the description of the parties, their obligations to each other, their description of the subject matter are all stated in the contract. Thus creating the legal obligations.

The emerging issue of smart contracts is what happens when an agreement can be enforced not by public law enforcers, but through the terms and mechanisms set forth in the terms of the contract itself. The typical legal action for breach of contract involves an aggrieved party going to a court of law or equity to demand money damages, restitution, or specific performance.  With a smart contract, the aggrieved party will need to go to the court to remedy a contract that has already been executed or is in the process of being performed. This is because, by definition, a strong smart contract is already executed or in the process of being executed by the time the court hears the case. So the remedy must come after the fact to undo or alter the agreement in some way.

It can be quite problematic to enforce the disputes that may arise from these types of contracts. There may be no central administering authority to decide a dispute between participants to a smart contract, forcing them to seek recourse in the courts. There may be no obvious defendant against whom legal action could be brought. For example, who would be responsible for system operational defects, corrupted messages, or defective programmer logic that led to non-performance (or unexpected performance) of a smart contract? It may be unclear if a legally binding contract exists between participants to a smart contract if they seek legal redress for breach of contract in the courts. Even if there is no clear contract, a smart contract transaction may itself have an effect on property rights – for instance, if it is a register of legal ownership – and so any dispute would need to be resolved as between the rival claimants to those property rights. Transactions using some digital ledger technologies, especially blockchains, can be conducted pseudonymously. If a dispute arose, how would an aggrieved participant to a permissionless blockchain identify the other party to a smart contract in order to bring legal proceedings against it? Would a court regard a smart contract hosted on a blockchain as having legally binding effect if it is simply not possible to identify who the other contracting party to it is? There may be difficulties in proving the existence or content of a smart contract in court proceedings where evidence exists only in electronic format on a distributed ledger or elsewhere. Enforcement of a court judgment or arbitration award in respect of a transaction using distributed ledger technologies may be problematic. Even where dispute resolution mechanisms exist for distributed ledger technologies, there may be problems applying them beyond the “trust boundaries”, that is, where they interact with third party systems.

Some of the approaches that may be useful may include where a distributed ledger technology has a central administering authority with the power to insert arbitrary or remedial transactions into that ledger (a permissioned ledger might provide for this), the parties might, for example, agree that this authority has the power to determine any disputes. This agreement might be contained in a particular smart contract, or it could be part of the terms and conditions accepted by the participant when it acquires an identity or otherwise participates in the particular ledger. The authority would need protection from disputes arising from its exercise of these powers. Again, that could be a term of a smart contract or the terms and conditions of the permissioned ledger.

Where:

  1. a distributed ledger has no central administering authority (whether the distributed ledger is permissioned or permissionless); or
  2. the parties do not wish to delegate dispute resolution to it; or
  3. it is logically impossible to unwind a transaction without the participation of a quorum of all of the participants, then the problems are more acute: it may be impossible to unwind a transaction even if clearly desired by the direct parties. A dispute resolution mechanism built into the smart contract itself could provide a solution.

Such a mechanism would need the following characteristics:

  • a provision in the contract code that causes delegation to an arbitrator, which would be triggered under rules encoded in the smart contract: for example by both parties asserting a defect and nominating the arbitrating entity;
  • a provision in the contract natural language version agreeing to submit disputes to arbitration: this assumes that there is a natural language version of the contract and that it matches the delegation mechanism in the contract code
  • a forum for arbitration, which could be administered centrally, or via a relevant ledger, or by use of one of the many existing and experienced fora. The forum would identify these essential components:–
    • a body of rules for the arbitration
    • pool of possible arbitrators, who could vary from persons able to provide expert determination at a low fee to high-value arbitrators capable of overseeing complex disputes
    • an administration capable of managing the cases as they are filed and decided.

A dispute resolution mechanism embedded in a smart contract reflects the advantages of a smart contract over a traditional contract: enforcement of the dispute resolution process and the consequent decision could be made automatic and integrated into the ledger. Not only would smart contracts deliver finality of agreed actions in performance, but also those actions and events that generate discord for whatever reason – disagreement over intent, bugs in the code, external exigencies could also achieve finality through a formal process. Such a mechanism might also provide a partial solution to the complexities of cross-jurisdictional trade. By using a common body of rules, the parties can agree to a rule base that is aligned across borders and legally acceptable within both jurisdictions.

 

LEGAL FINDINGS ON BLOCKCHAIN AND CRYPTOCURRENCY IN KENYA

The era of blockchain and cryptocurrency is with us. The question that remains is; Are the blockchain transactions legal? In this short journal I will try to bring out the news on the ground and what the Kenyan legislatures have commented on the topic and where they actually hold their ground.

First is to understand what blockchain and cryptocurrencies are. Blockchain in the lay man’s terms is a digital ledger in which transactions made in bitcoin or another cryptocurrency are recorded chronologically and publicly. Cryptocurrency is a digital currency in which encryption techniques are used to regulate the generation of units of currency and verify the transfer of funds, operating independently of a central bank.

The niche of the cryptocurrency definition that I would like to expound on and which forms the basis for the legal structure is that cryptocurrency operates independently of a central bank.

This takes me back to 2015 when the Central Bank of Kenya (CBK) released two circulars one to the general public and the other to the banks in Kenya.

The circulars had one message in common that the public and the banks should refrain from using or transaction in bitcoin and cryptocurrencies. The bank informed the public that virtual currencies such as Bitcoin are not legal tender in Kenya and therefore no protection exists in the event that the platform that exchanges or holds the virtual currency fails or goes out of business.

Among the reasons they cited by the Central Bank’s stand were:

  • Transactions in virtual currencies such as bitcoin untraceable and anonymous making them susceptible to abuse by criminals in money laundering and financing of terrorism.
  • Virtual currencies are traded in exchange platforms that are unregulated all over the world. Consumers may therefore lose their money without having any legal redress in the event these exchanges collapse or close business.
  • There is no underlying or backing of assets and the value of virtual currencies is speculative in nature. This may result in high volatility in value of virtual currencies thus exposing users to potential losses.

The CBK then cautioned the banks in Kenya and all institutions against dealing in virtual currencies or transacting with entities that are engaged in virtual currencies. They were advised not to open accounts for any person(s) dealing in virtual currencies such as Bitcoin. Failure to comply with the directive would lead to appropriate remedial action from the Central Bank.

This could well be understood from a legal aspect as the Central Bank’s notice could be view as a precautionary measure protecting the interests of the bank. Mainly this could insulate the Central Bank of Kenya from any legal proceedings in relation to cryptocurrencies in the event one loses their money via cryptocurrency.

It should also be noted that the statute creating the bank, The Central Bank of Kenya Act, Cap 491 Laws of Kenya only defines two types of currencies as defined as under Sec 2 of the Act:

·         currency means the currency of Kenya or foreign currency;

·         currency of Kenya means bank notes and coins issued by the Bank under section 22(1) and any right to receive such bank notes or coins in respect of any credit or balance at a bank or financial institution located within or outside Kenya;

·         foreign currency means bank notes or coins which are or have at any time been legal tender in any territory outside Kenya and any right to receive such bank notes or coins in respect of any credit or balance at a bank either within or outside Kenya;

It is thus not in the Central Bank’s power to regulate cryptocurrency, unless the statute is to be amended. The Bank is given the power to regulate transactions relating to currency which is physical unlike cryptocurrency which is virtual. The transactions are not traceable when compared to the normal currency transfer.

This will make one query, who then is to regulate cryptocurrencies? Which institution is to deal with these type of transactions?

These are questions in every investors mind. If I buy a coin in the initial coin offerings (ICO’s), how can I protect myself against fraudsters and business vultures who are only there for the wrong reasons and not investments?

According to research done many have answered these questions with the view that liability should be on the company and/or persons who are selling the cryptocurrency. Thus the only way to regulate the Cryptocurrencies is by regulating the companies that are going into the business. This can be done by analyzing their business projections which are usually laid out in the whitepaper. The company should be kept under checks and balances to ensure that the objectives of the company and promises made to investors have been reached.

Kenya’s Company law gives a company its own entity as a legal person which can own property, do transactions, sue and be sued. The company’s articles and memorandum act as the guiding light for the company. Thus, regulating cryptocurrency on the company level would be the most reasonable approach in regulating cryptocurrencies.

Recommendations:

In conclusion to this first part of the journal, it is my recommendation that we should as a country, develop an act regulating the crypto field. The act will seek to establish a body that will, as one of its duties, regulate all companies transacting on cryptocurrency and blockchain technologies.

This in my view will work to regulate the companies and the projects they are to initiate, it will deter those using companies as fronts for their illegal dealings from establishing these schemes in Kenya and finally it will work to protect the consumer in this case, investors, from losing their money on investments.

This will also see the growth of the economy as many investors and innovators in the science and technology department will come up. The misconceptions and myths of the technology will have been fully addressed thus reducing the negativity the technology is facing in the country.

 

Written by,

Kihara Kang’ethe,

Legal Advisor,

Ubrica Legal Office.

 

Mt. Longonot Climb: Soul Searching Epiphany Journey for Universal Health

MT.  LONGONOT CLIMB-A-THON FOR WEALTH, WELLNESS AND WELL BEING

Our soul searching epiphany journey is a quest for universal health involving reflecting on our lives to collectively discover and bring profound understanding (breakthroughs). Epiphany is a moment when you suddenly know you understand something or become conscious of something that is very important to your life. Epiphanies do not come from the mind. They come from the soul with the goal of moving from knowledge (information) to understanding (awareness).

Our February search takes us to Mt. Longonot in Nakuru county Kenya.

Breakthroughs are the products of work of the soul, the mind and the body working together. When breakthroughs occur,  we begin to see something in a different light.

Quest for Universal Health

Our quest involves an African mountains climb-a-thon. We intend to climb a mountain a month to helps us achieve epiphany for universal health. The climb-a-thon will bring people from all over the nation and the world.  Together will seek to understand universal health, and seek answers on what it will take to achieve it.

THE PROBLEM

  • Our health system is broken and does no work
  • Our people die from diseases that others have known how to cure for centuries
  • Our women die just because they get pregnant
  • Children die just because they are born
  • Our hospitals do not have supplies
  • Our medical professionals are frustrated
  • Our nurses and our doctors are in recurrent strikes. As soon as one group is done the other one picks up the strike

These problems indicate that

  • We do not know health
  • We do not produce health
  • We do not make health
  • We do not have health

Therefore, we cannot provide health, for no one can provide something s/he doesn’t have not have.

THE QUESTION

What is health?

  • How do we produce it?
  • How do we make it?
  • How do we have it?
  • How do we provide it?

PATHWAY TO DISCOVERY

To find answers to the question we have to go on a collective soul searching journey to seek the answers together, collectively as a nation.

We must gain insight into the five levels of universal health:

  • individual health,
  • family health,
  • community health,
  • nation health, and
  • global health.

We embark on an epiphany journey which will involve climbing a mountain a month for until we find the answer to the question. Together we get to understand universal health.

Calendar of the Climb-a-thon

Date Mountain Location Elevation (M)
January 27, 2018 Ngong Hills Kajiado 2,460
February 17, 2018 Mt. Longonot Nakuru 2,776
March 24, 2018 Mt. Kilimambogo Machakos 2,145
April 21, 2018 Mt. Kenya Nyeri 5,119
May 26, 2018 Mt. Lesatima Nyandarua 4,001
June 23, 2018 Mt. Suswa Nakuru 2,356
July 28, 2018 Mt. Marsabit Marsabit 1,707
August 25, 2018 Mt. Korosi Baringo 1,446
September 29, 2018 Mt. Menengai Nyandarua 2,278
October 27, 2018 Mt. Homa Homabay 1,751
November 24, 2018 Loroghi Hills Maralal 2,580
December 29, 2018 Mt. Elgon Kenya-Uganda border 4,321

 

LONGONOTCLIMB FEES

  • Kenyan Residents KSh. 6,000
  • East African Residents KSh. 7,000
  • Non Residents KSh. 10,000

PACKAGE

  • Transport to and fro
  • Entrance fees
  • Armed guide fee
  • 2 bottles of water (500ml) + cookies
  • Lunch (Mbuzi Choma)
  • Photography
  • T-Shirt
  • Cap

ACTIVITIES

Aerobics before and after the hike

  • Hiking
  • Swimming (optional and self-sponsored)
  • Fun games and team building
  • Photography
  • Nature walks

BRING

  • Additional drinking water
  • Snacks
  • Camera
  • ID/Passport
  • Swimming costumes

WEAR

  • Casual slacks or cargo pants
  • Comfy hiking shoes
  • No skirts
  • Light and warm clothing

Are you ready for the mountain?

Sign up now! Please write to Grace Njeri Kariuki at grace.njeri @ubrica.com, or call, +254 755 844 017, or + 1 404 395 6906

Ubrica Live Mothers Live Babies Team

NB.  Mt. Kenya in April 19 – 23, 2018! Mt. Kenya requires rigorous training.

Ngong Hills Climb: Soul Searching Epiphany Journey for Universal Health

Insight from Ngong

Ngong Hills Climb took place Saturday, January 27, 2018.

We will achieve universal health by paying the right price for the things that women produce, and for services provided by women. We shall not achieve global health if we continue to exploit women by paying very low prices for the products of their labor.

Middlemen and brokers who buy goods produced by women at dirt cheap prices exploit them, ultimately driving them to extreme poverty.

When impoverished, a woman cannot take care of biological needs to maintain strong body that can carry pregnancy to term. Many women die during pregnancy because they do not have money to buy things that would help them improve the strength of their body, or money to go to the clinic for checkup.

If the woman with a weak body, survives pregnancy, she definitely will produce a weak baby. Weak babies have limited chance of survival to their first birthday. Children born weak, to women with little or no money are highly likely to die before age 5.

We will change all this by making sure that every woman is paid the right price for her work. We will will change all this by helping women have direct access to the market where they can sell their products directly without brokers and middlemen.

What experiences did you get from Ngong?

What insight? Share in the comment box below.

Longonot next. February 17, 2018

COMMENTS

Bishop Shisumu McKenzie

Thanks for the Insight.

I have always told women never to liken themselves to men.

Women are something; they are wired differently. Give them a sperm they give you a child. Given them a house they make a home. Given them  seed money they create the empire of business. The list goes on and on.

They can multitask. God took special time to create them; the softest thing you can have in your life. We must preserve them. Protect them.

We must have good healthcare for them. God gives them life, they carry life 9 months. Bring forth live babies; keeps them live until we have generations, what else do you want me to say? So much we can’t finish.

 

 

 

Soul Searching Epiphany Journey for Universal Health

CLIMB-A-THON FOR WEALTH, WELLNESS AND WELL BEING

by Susan Nyambura Njuguna

Our soul searching epiphany journey is a quest for universal health involving reflecting on our lives to collectively discover and bring profound understanding (breakthroughs). Epiphany is a moment when you suddenly know you understand something or become conscious of something that is very important to your life. Epiphanies do not come from the mind. They come from the soul with the goal of moving from knowledge (information) to understanding (awareness).

Breakthroughs are the products of work of the soul, the mind and the body working together. When breakthroughs occur,  we begin to see something in a different light.

Quest for Universal Health

Our quest involves an African mountains climb-a-thon. We intend to climb a mountain a month to helps us achieve epiphany for universal health. The climb-a-thon will bring people from all over the nation and the world.  Together will seek to understand universal health, and seek answers on what it will take to achieve it.

THE PROBLEM

  • Our health system is broken and does no work
  • Our people die from diseases that others have known how to cure for centuries
  • Our women die just because they get pregnant
  • Children die just because they are born
  • Our hospitals do not have supplies
  • Our medical professionals are frustrated
  • Our nurses and our doctors are in recurrent strikes. As soon as one group is done the other one picks up the strike

These problems indicate that

  • We do not know health
  • We do not produce health
  • We do not make health
  • We do not have health

Therefore, we cannot provide health, for no one can provide something s/he doesn’t have not have.

THE QUESTION

What is health?

  • How do we produce it?
  • How do we make it?
  • How do we have it?
  • How do we provide it?

PATHWAY TO DISCOVERY

To find answers to the question we have to go on a collective soul searching journey to seek the answers together, collectively as a nation.

We must gain insight into the five levels of universal health:

  • individual health,
  • family health,
  • community health,
  • nation health, and
  • global health.

We embark on an epiphany journey which will involve climbing a mountain a month for until we find the answer to the question. Together we get to understand universal health.

Calendar of the Climb-a-thon

Date Mountain Location Elevation (M)
January 27, 2018 Ngong Hills Kajiado 2,460
February 17, 2018 Mt. Longonot Nakuru 2,776
March 24, 2018 Mt. Kilimambogo Machakos 2,145
April 21, 2018 Mt. Kenya Nyeri 5,119
May 26, 2018 Mt. Lesatima Nyandarua 4,001
June 23, 2018 Mt. Suswa Nakuru 2,356
July 28, 2018 Mt. Marsabit Marsabit 1,707
August 25, 2018 Mt. Korosi Baringo 1,446
September 29, 2018 Mt. Menengai Nyandarua 2,278
October 27, 2018 Mt. Homa Homabay 1,751
November 24, 2018 Loroghi Hills Maralal 2,580
December 29, 2018 Mt. Elgon Kenya-Uganda border 4,321

LONGONOT CLIMB PROGRAM, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2018 

 

Coming soon.

LONGONOTCLIMB FEES

  • Kenyan Residents KSh. 6,000
  • East African Residents KSh. 7,000
  • Non Residents KSh. 10,000

PACKAGE

  • Transport to and fro
  • Entrance fees
  • Armed guide fee
  • 2 bottles of water (500ml) + cookies
  • Lunch (Mbuzi Choma)
  • Photography
  • T-Shirt
  • Cap

ACTIVITIES

Aerobics before and after the hike

  • Hiking
  • Swimming (optional and self-sponsored)
  • Fun games and team building
  • Photography
  • Nature walks

BRING

  • Additional drinking water
  • Snacks
  • Camera
  • ID/Passport
  • Swimming costumes

WEAR

  • Casual slacks or cargo pants
  • Comfy hiking shoes
  • No skirts
  • Light and warm clothing

Then, Mt. Kenya in April 19 – 23, 2018! Mt. Kenya requires rigorous training.

Are you ready for the mountain?

Sign up now! Please write to Grace Njeri Kariuki at grace.njeri @ubrica.com, or call, +254 755 844 017

Ubrica Live Mothers Live Babies Team

Ubrica Event at Sahara West Park

Dr. Mac! Dissertation Mentoring Handbook – Research Toolkit

The video below contains important information from Dr. Mac! Dissertation Mentoring Handbook published in 2010.
Since the recording, contact information and location of the research institute has changed.

Purchase the handbooks NOW!

Reach Dr. Mac! by information below

___________________________________________________

Macharia Waruingi, MD DHA
Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Health Administration
President and Chairman of the Board
Ustawi Biomedical Research Innovation and Industrial Centers of Africa [UBRICA]
Email: macharia.waruingi [at] ubrica.com
Web: http://ubrica.com

 

Purchase the handbooks NOW!