10. BUSINESS MODEL

Soko Janja will be the principal mechanism for distribution and adoption of Ubricoin. People will use Ubricoin on Soko Janja for purchasing and in turn they will receive incentives and rewards. People will be able to acquire Ubricoins on Soko Janja and get loyalty points. They will then use the Ubricoin and reuse the loyalty points to access other services in the Ubrica ecosystem including the URCCs, uSTPs and BMIC. Soko Janja will help to build a community of users.

10.1.        MARKET SCALING

We will launch the test phase for the product in Kenya, where we will connect to about 50 users’ per-day for an average of 20 days per month. That will be an average of 1000 people per month. During this test phase, we will enroll people as manufacturers and suppliers. Our social media team will reach at least 5 million people. The conversion ratio is 0.0001%, this means only 1 person in a million will respond to an e-commerce site. In other words 5 million people would produce 5 active users. Sustained campaign would produce gradual growth until a tipping point where hundreds people would convert to active users, we expect to reach the tipping point in 5 years of sustained campaigned. From there we expect exponential growth of user-base to reach tens of millions of active users

We will use the platform to gather valuable data that will be key for further development of the platform. We will be able to estimate the precision of the discovery results and the possibility of finding a better deal on some of the unlisted manufacturers and suppliers.

10.2.       Market maintenance/ Artificial intelligence

User profiling is a key to developing a strong artificial intelligence algorithm. We will use our main website (https://ubricoin.ubrica.com/), Ubrica Global Journal System (http://jghcs.info), Ubrica website (http://ubrica.com) and Soko Janja (http://sokojanja.com) to gather data on user behavior. The Ubricoin platform itself will be gathering online behavioral data. We will use this data for the machine learning process to produce more precise user profiling in Ubrica. The data will help us to launch initial global communication campaign for acquiring partners.

10.3.       Acquiring Ubricoins

There are two ways people can get involved with Ubricoin

  • Purchasing the Ubrica token through https://ubricoin.ubrica.com/buy-ubricoin/
  • Proof of excellence reward system, by joining the proof of excellence reward system you get a chance to take part in developing an excellent community. This include rating people who do good in the community and purchasing locally produced goods in Soko Janja.

In both cases, you will be increasing the value of the currency and participating in the global health program. When you purchase goods on Soko Janja you help in activating the local and the village level commerce.  By buying from each other you increase value through mutual exchange facilitated by a peer-to-peer fair trading system. As a custom token and a solution, specially designed to ensure universal health access, Ubricoin has a highly promising future of a healthy community and excellent services both in the education and health sector. A community based, driven and owned system where people will be able to buy directly from each other without mediators and access quality health care.

9. UBRICA ONE BIOMEDICAL INDUSTRIAL CITY

We propose to implement Ubrica One Biomedical Industrial City in Kenya (“Ubrica One”). We will build Ubrica One on multiple disparate land parcels all aggregating to approximately 4,000-acres. The complete project will be multiple master-planned biomedical industrial parks with specialty hospitals fashioned as academic medical centers (“AMCs”), research facilities, residential areas, and specialized industrial zones.

9.1. STRATEGY

Ubrica one will host a Children & Women’s AMC, a Heart & Lungs AMC, a Neuroscience & Rehabilitation AMC, a Trauma & Orthopedic AMC, an Eye & Ear AMC, a Cancer Hospital & Hospice Care AMC,  a Tropical & Infectious Diseases AMC, a Renal & Urologic AMC, a Gastro-Intestinal Diseases AMC.

9.1.1.         Vision

Our vision is to create places that will be lead centers of excellence in global health in:

  • discovery, development, and commercialization of cutting edge technologies in biomedicine
  • world class services in health promotion, disease detection, disease prevention, and disease treatment.

9.1.2. Mission

Our mission is to establish and sustain leadership in:

  • Translational research in human biology, human physiology and human medicine
  • Nano-science, biotechnology, molecular biology and human genetics
  • Clinical medicine
  • Organization of systems of delivery of care
  • Information systems for health

9.1.3. Theoretical Underpinning

Our project is underpinned by the theory of knowledge conversion continuum that explains that knowledge has to traverse five distinct stages to translate in products that people can use to solve problems of everyday life: EXPLORATION—RESEARCH—PUBLICATION—TRANSLATION—APPLICATION.

9.1.4. Phenomenal Structure

The phenomenal structure of Ubrica One is grounded by four primary functions of a world class academic medical center: RESEARCH—EDUCATION—INNOVATION—PATIENT CARE. We propose to build Ubrica One as an all-inclusive development with multiple land uses to be located on an aggregate of 4,000-acre lot of land in Kenya. Upon completion, Ubrica One will be home to eight ultramodern academic specialty medical centers structured as world class HOSPITALS, centers for advanced science in biomedicine structured for advanced RESEARCH, and centers for biomedical translation and innovation structured for COMMERCIALIZATION and MANUFACTURING

TABLE 2. KEY FEATURES OF THE UBRICA ONE BIOMEDICAL INDUSTRIAL CITY

Structure Function
HOSPITALS Eight ultramodern academic medical centers providing patient care and education.
RESEARCH Centers for advanced biomedical research.
PRODUCT COMMERCIALIZATION and MANUFACTURE Centers for advanced biomedical translation, innovation, and commercialization of knowledge into products and services for home and clinical use, and manufacture of products.

 

The phenomenal structure of the Ubrica One is underpinned by the theory of advanced academic medical center that is built on the principle of integration to collocate the functions of advanced research in science technology and medicine [RESEARCH], world class medical and science education [TEACHING], translation of research knowledge products into commercial products for everyday use at home and in the clinical environments [INNOVATION], and delivery of care of the highest quality possible [PATIENT CARE] (Figure 8).

img class=”alignnone wp-image-419 size-full” src=”https://ubricoin.ubrica.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/bmic.jpg” sizes=”(max-width: 1347px) 100vw, 1347px” srcset=”https://ubricoin.ubrica.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/bmic.jpg 1347w, https://ubricoin.ubrica.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/bmic-560×146.jpg 560w, https://ubricoin.ubrica.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/bmic-300×78.jpg 300w, https://ubricoin.ubrica.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/bmic-768×200.jpg 768w, https://ubricoin.ubrica.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/bmic-1024×266.jpg 1024w, https://ubricoin.ubrica.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/bmic-1200×312.jpg 1200w” alt=”” width=”1347″ height=”350″ />FIGURE 8. PHENOMENAL STRUCTURE OF UBRICA ONE DEPICTING FUNCTIONAL KINSHIP OF AN ADVANCED ACADEMIC MEDICAL CENTER THAT INTEGRATES RESEARCH, TEACHING AND INNOVATION WITH PATIENT CARE.

 

This proposal contains a brief description of the project, starting with the explanation of the background of the problem that the project is meant to solve. In addition, the proposal explains the purpose of Ubrica, the general approach to implementation, and the significance of implementation Ubrica One.
9.2. STATEMENT OF INTENT

Our intent is to create in Kenya, centers of excellence for (a) discovery, development and commercialization of cutting edge technologies in biomedicine, and (b) world class health care services in health promotion, disease prevention, and treatment. Two major and closely interrelated problems motivate our intent:

  • The severe inadequate infrastructure for global health. Health services in many countries of the world are unsafe, of low quality, and inaccessible to majority of the people.  People, afraid to use health services locally, seek medical care in other countries. Indeed, healthcare consumers would be willing to pay more for better care that is of high value, of efficient supply of drugs, of better technical quality, of well-maintained health facilities, and of short wait times. The specific problem is that an entity that can produce comprehensive world-class medical service is lacking.  Ubrica One will be home to five ultramodern academic specialty medical centers structured as world-class hospitals to deliver care of the highest quality possible.
  • The absence of health services and biomedical innovative research and development (R&D) capability. Ubrica One is poised to create a world-class research facilities attached to the world-class hospitals. The research facilities will serve as centers for research excellence in Kenya. The centers will produce the best-in class researchers in health, medicine, and basic sciences. The research facilities will also serve as technology transfer organizations that will manage intellectual property, licensing, and commercialization of products of research, and industrial development to meet health needs of people.

9.3. BACKGROUND OF THE PROBLEM

In this section we present the background of the problem addressed in this proposal from the framework of knowledge conversion. The section underpins knowledge conversion as the centerpiece of national development, emphasizing the central importance of comprehending knowledge conversion to comprehend development.
9.3.1. Theoretical Underpinning: National Development a Function of Knowledge Conversion

Knowledge conversion is the work of discovering knowledge residing in the local environments and mastering the discovered knowledge to create products and services that people and organizations can use to advance themselves and to defend themselves from enemies. Knowledge converts in five steps starting from exploration, going to research, then to publication, then to translation and finally to application of knowledge (Figure 9).

FIGURE 9. USTAWI STAGES OF KNOWLEDGE CONVERSION CONTINUUM

Note. From, Macharia Waruingi (2010). Knowledge conversion by open innovation. Ustawi the knowledge conversion organization. Minnetonka, MN: Ustawi. (Used with permission of author.)

 

Human development depends on capability of people residing in that nation, to muster all the five stages of knowledge conversion in all fields of knowledge. A developed nation in biomedicine, for example, is the one that has built a full-scale capability for exploratory work in biomedicine, biomedical research, publication and dissemination of biomedical knowledge, translation of published biomedical knowledge into products such as pharmaceuticals and medical devices and systems for delivery of health care services, and application of biomedical knowledge in health promotion, disease prevention, cure of disease, and education of present and future generations of care providers.  Table 4 depicts the steps in the knowledge conversion continuum in biomedicine.

TABLE 3. STAGES OF THE KNOWLEDGE CONVERSION CONTINUUM, AND PRODUCTS ASSOCIATED TO EACH STAGE

  Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Stage 5
Process Exploration Research Publication Translation Application
Product Discovery of facts, theories, and propositions, Verification of facts, theories, and propositions JournalsThesis

Text books

Popular books

Art

Intellectual capital management, patents PharmaceuticalsMedical devices

Health delivery systems

Education systems

 

Typically, underdeveloped nations lack the will to develop capability for exploration, research, and translation of knowledge. Because they lack the will to develop these capabilities, they rely for their existence, on application of products and services created from knowledge discovered in other countries. They rely on foreign facts, theories and propositions to implement their work programs in their nations. Facts, theories and propositions from foreign sources do not have working capacity in local situations because they do not fit. Because of this problem, nations that rely on theories developed from knowledge products generated for a foreign nation remain underdeveloped and subservient to the nations from where the theories originated.
9.3.2. Relevance

For example, theories about approach to diseases developed from knowledge collected in Boston, Massachusetts in the United States is of little help to a clinician in Nyeri County dealing with medical conditions local to Nyeri County  Hospital in Kenya; much less in a health center in Mukurweini, or Othaya in Kenya. Geography, culture, climate and other local forces have it that diseases that occur in Nyeri are different from the diseases that occur in Boston. Furthermore, the local environments (culture, diet, nutrition, climate, geography, economy) affect the human physiology in such manner that the physiology adapts to local conditions. Indeed, the local environment modifies human genetic expression, which in turn modifies the human physiology for adaptation to needs of the local environment.
9.3.3. Relevance Paradox

Humans who live in hot climates are comfortable in high temperatures and do not tolerate the cold climates without a period of acclimatization. Similarly, humans who live in the lowlands with high oxygen tension do not tolerate low oxygen-tension highlands without a period of acclimatization. This physiological adaptation of individuals means that the human body tolerates medications differently according to local environment. Rather, factors in local environment determine the effectiveness of a medical treatment given to an individual. As such, medicines developed with knowledge gathered from Boston dwellers, may have lower effectiveness on Nyeri dwellers. Thus, use of knowledge from Boston to solve problems plaguing people in Nyeri leads to incomplete solutions, with attendant negative consequences.
9.3.4. Exploration and Discovery

Theories and propositions about how do help people deal with medical problems in Nyeri must come from the work of discovery of such knowledge in Nyeri, and not Boston. Theories and propositions about health and disease in Nyeri must be verified through formal research about health and disease in Nyeri.
9.3.5. Intellectual Property Protection

The discovered theories, propositions, and their verifications must be protected with appropriate regulations and patents to safeguard loss of intellectual property. Unprotected intellectual property is open to exploitation by outsiders leading to tremendous loss.
9.3.6. Publication

After appropriate protection, the discovered theories, propositions, and their verifications must be published in journals, books, thesis, monographs for dissemination to schools, universities, government organizations, non-governmental organizations, business organizations, and indeed to all interested individuals. The published knowledge is then available for creation of new products and services that have fit and working capacity in the local environment. Local companies can use the translated knowledge to create medicines, medical devices, health delivery systems, medical services systems, etc.
9.3.7. Application

The glaring absence of medical manufacturing in African countries, and the extremely poor quality of medical services is the product of lack of attention to exploration, research, publication and translation of local knowledge. A country that has no local knowledge resembles a human being whose higher center of the brain is amputated.
9.3.8. Knowledge Conversion in Biomedicine for Global Health

Developing countries lag behind in knowledge conversion in biomedicine. Many governments of developing countries allocate no investments on exploration of knowledge that would lead to discovery of bio-medical facts, theories and propositions. Furthermore, governments of developing countries invest very little in research that would lead to verification of facts, theories and propositions. They do not invest in discovery and verification for the benefit of the citizens of their nations. To overcome this problem, we must discover new ways of funding knowledge conversion in biomedicine for global health using blockchain.
9.3.9. Private Sector and Knowledge Conversion in Biomedicine in the World

Private health care sector has historically played an important role in health services delivery in developing countries. The absence of a well-organized health insurance system and ambivalence in health care financing, however, limit the growth of the private health care. In recent years, several developing countries have rapidly re-emerged from grinding poverty, and business is springing back. The national leadership is supportive of the private health care enterprise, encouraging private investment in health care and medical facilities. The general problem is that health systems in developing countries, suffering long-term neglect and lack of investment, is indeed inadequate, with high rate of infection in hospitals and limited medical equipment.

Investment in world-class Ubrica One Biomedical Industrial City will help to overcome the problem of global health. Specifically, Ubrica One will be the beacon of hope for biomedical discovery and a source of excellence in bio-scientific publications. In addition, Ubrica One will lead to a new horizon of translational medicine, medical devices and pharmaceutical manufacturing for global health.
9.4. BMIC 3 BILLION UBNs

We will sell 3 billion UBNs to fund biomedical industrial city. This sale will occur in 2024 at US $10 per coin. The fund raised will be used for design, development, construction and management of BMIC. We will issue coins to facilitate construction and post construction management of biomedical industrial city, to function as epicenter for discovery and development of medical innovations for global health.
9.4.1. Reward System

Holders of Ubricoin will receive discounted services at the biomedical industrial Center. The discounted services will include: healthcare services, hospitality and tourism. The users of BMIC will receive loyalty point.
9.4.2. Reuse of points

The loyalty points will be used to assess services in the Ubrica ecosystem such as shopping on Soko Janja and receiving services in URCCs. The points will also be used in the pooled smart contract.

The 3 billion coins will be issued in four phases each phase raising funds to support different segments of this project.

 

Biomedical Industrial City Timeline Tokens@$10/token Phases  Uses
April 1, 2024 200M Private Sale

 

Design ·         Desktop and field research·         Doctors and other professionals

·         User research

June 1, 2024 300M Pre-sale Development ·         Physical planning, geotechnical studies, suitability analysis, Architecture, Engineering, Economic planners, Construction planning, Security, Information technology.
August 1, 2024 1.5B Crowdsale Construction ·         Land purchase and entitlement·         Government
October 1, 2024 1B Initial Token Offering Management ·         Mortgages·         Incentives

·         Customer satisfaction

·         Excellence in education, clinical practice and performance in all fields

9.4.3. Phase 1. Private sale

We will issue 200 million UBNs to facilitate the design of the BMIC, setting out the strategy and deciding on the best model for implementation. We require a lot of desktop and field research to understand the BMIC scope. This will be done by a team of professionals.
9.4.4. Phase 2. Presale

In this stage we will issue 300 million UBNs. This will be used for the development of BMIC. We will identify and hire architects, engineers and planners who will be responsible for developing the project scope and planning the implementation of the BMIC.

These funds will be used to do feasibility studies which will include Physical planning, geotechnical studies, suitability analysis, Architecture, Engineering, Economic planners, Construction planning, Security, Information technology.
9.4.5. Phase 3. Crowdsale

We will issue 1.5 billion UBNs to facilitate the construction of the BMIC. We intend to construct BMIC in Kenya. These funds will be used to purchase land, entitlement and the construction material for this project. The raised funds will also be used to do monitoring and evaluation of the project.
9.4.6.Phase 4. Initial Token Offering

We will issue 1 billion UBNs to support management of the BMIC. We will use the funds to create a mortgage program to facilitate ownership of medical and scientific real estate. We will also create a reserve fund to support operation of innovation hubs within the BMIC, until breakeven. Operations of an innovation within the BMIC will be responsible for generating high quality research, idea innovation, translation/commercialization of knowledge into products and services that help solve local problems. The BMIC will bridge the university with the industry and with the local community.

To stimulate new innovation we will create a bounty programs to reward individuals or groups with new scientific ideas that will help provide solutions to our vexing problems. We will issue tokens to people who will

  • do original research,
  • publish the results of their original research,
  • present the results of their research in scientific conferences locally and internationally,
  • translate their research knowledge into commercial prototypes, and
  • commercialize their prototypes into products of everyday use.

8. UNIVERSITY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS

A science and technology park, also known as a research park is a property based development that fosters the growth of tenant firms and affiliated with a higher institution of learning. The purpose is to facilitate sharing of knowledge, promote innovation and advance research to viable commercial products. Ubrica will facilitate design, development and implementation of 66 Science and Technology Parks (STPs) for Kenyan universities. We will also provide STP Development and Management Service through our Scientific Real Estate Development Division (SREDD). The Science and Technology Park Development and Management Service will involve setting out the strategy and objectives of the 66 new parks and deciding on the best model for implementation. SREDD will manage many complex processes and diverse relationships. We shall allocate 2 billion Ubricoins to fund design, development, implementation and management of 66 STPs in Kenya.

8.1. How Science and Technology Parks Benefit the Local Community

The Science and Technology Parks provide locations that foster innovation and development and commercialization of technology and where government, universities and private companies may collaborate.

Science parks may offer a number of shared resources such as incubators, program and collaboration activities, telecommunication hubs, reception, security, among others
Science parks also aim to bring together people who assist the developers of technology to bring their work to commercial fruition.
They can be attractive to university students who may interact with prospective employers.
Apart from tenants, science parks create jobs for the local community for example they may be built with restaurants sports facilities, etc.
Science parks catalyze community innovation.
8.2. Translation and Commercialization of Science

We opened dialogue with several Universities in Africa for commercialization of science. We developed a Science and Technology Park Development and Management and Technology Transfer Services Agreement that will be used to guide our relationships with Universities. This science and technology park development and management, and technology transfer or knowledge conversion services agreement will be made with UBRICA as the “Manager” and the University as the “Institution.”

8.2.1. Ubrica-University Science and Technology Park Management and Technology Transfer Services

In this agreement, Ubrica will provide two services to Universities, science park development and management services and technology transfer or knowledge conversion services.

8.2.2. Knowledge Conversion/Technology Transfer Service

Ubrica will establish a University Technology Transfer Office to facilitate the commercialization of University intellectual property, including patents and copyrights. Ubrica’s Technology Transfer Office (UTTO) will work with researchers and students in every college to prepare new inventions for the patenting process and potential licensing opportunities.

UTTO’s job will be to create sustained focus on transferring cutting-edge research and innovation to the commercial marketplace, generating revenue and diversifying the economy. The UTTO will have knowledgeable and professional staff with specialized backgrounds. The UTTO staff will work in collaborative teams to create markets, execute patenting and licensing of new ideas, discoveries and innovations, to translate them into the commercial products and services. The UTTO will be responsible for the development, protection, and utilization of intellectual property rights. UTTO will serve as the liaison of cooperative ventures between University and industry.

8.2.3. Start-Up Companies

UTTO will promote and facilitate business development and entrepreneurship by bringing researchers together with experienced entrepreneurs and investors to form companies for commercializing university technologies. The UTTO will create and foster new start-up companies that will create jobs and provide mutually beneficial relationships to advance technological innovations and to bring their services into the marketplace. UTTO will maintain an electronic database of start-ups based on university technology. The data base will be publicly available through Ubrica Website that people can view and invest directly.

8.3. Incentive Structure for Science Parks

We will create a reward system for the science park. Staff members who will work in collaborative teams to create markets, execute patenting and licensing of new ideas, discoveries and innovations will receive rewards. The Ubricoin will be used to provide discounting services for knowledge conversion enterprise in:

Exploration during the needs assessments and feasibility studies
Research for both qualitative (phemenological, ethnography and grounded theory) and quantitative research (non-experimental, quasi experimental and experimental studies)
Publication of original works, white papers, monographs, anectdotes and case reports
Translation of scientific knowledge which may include execution of patents, intellectual protection.
Commercialization of products of research.

The reward system will also facilitate the translation of innovations into commercial products and services. Researchers and students who will work with Ubrica’s Technology Transfer Office (UTTO) will also receive incentive.

We will build a structure for incentivizing. The university lecturers/professors who provide quality education by showing good class attendance and engaging students in practical work which will result to a high number of skillful graduates placed to employment. In addition, the lecturers/professors will be rewarded for doing a follow up on the students’ performance in professional life. They will further get rewards for the use of Ubricoin in financial transactions and buying products on Soko Janja.

8.4. STPS 2 BILLION UBNS

These coins will be sold in the year 2020 at US $5 per coin to support science and technology in developing countries. We will sell coins to facilitate the knowledge transfer from the universities to the industry. The 2 billion coins will be sold in four phases each phase raising funds to support different segment of this project.

8.4.1.        Phase 1. Private sale

We will sell 100 million UBNs to facilitate the design of the STPs. Setting out the strategy and deciding on the best model for implementation. We require a lot of desktop and field research to understand the STPs scope and relationships. This will be done by a team of professional we will therefore, sell these UBNs to support this stage of STP development.

8.4.2.       Phase 2. Presale

In this stage we will sell 300 million UBNs. This will be used for the development of STPs. We will identify and hire architects, engineers and planners who will be responsible for developing the project scope and planning the implementation of the STPs.

We will use the funds to support feasibility studies which will include physical planning, geotechnical studies, suitability analysis, architecture, engineering, economic planners, construction planning, security, information technology.

8.4.3.       Phase 3. Crowdsale

We will sell 1 billion UBNs to facilitate the construction of the STPs. We intend to construct 66 STPs in different Kenyan universities. These funds will be used to purchase land, entitlement and the construction material for this project.  These funds will be used to monitor and evaluate the project

8.4.4.      Phase 4. Initial Token Offering

We will sell 600 million UBNs to support management of the STPs. We will use the funds to create a mortgage program to facilitate ownership of scientific real estate developed as innovation hubs. We will also create a reserve fund to support operation of innovation hubs within each STP, until breakeven. Operations of an innovation hub within an STP will be responsible for generating high quality research, idea innovation, translation/commercialization of knowledge into products and services that help solve local problems.

STPs will bridge the university with the industry and with the local community. To stimulate new innovation we will create a bounty programs to reward individuals or groups with new scientific ideas that will help provide solutions to our vexing problems. We will issue tokens to people who will

  • do original research,
  • publish the results of their original research,
  • present the results of their research in scientific conferences locally and internationally,
  • translate their research knowledge into commercial prototypes, and
  • commercialize their prototypes into products of everyday use.

 

7. UNIVERSAL HEALTH COVERAGE

We focus on our intent to build Sustainable One Health Communities (SOHCs) comprising six primary components

Figure 7. PHYSIOLOGICAL FEATURES OF A SUSTAINABLE ONE-HEALTH COMMUNITY
  • A co-operative Society of Ubricans (CSU) constituted by our members drawing from local communities.
  • Produce/product workshops for improving quality and packaging of things produced by our members.
  • A retail store that serves as a market for produce and products by members of the CSU.
  • A one-health clinic that provides clinical services to members of the CSU.
  • A web/mobile platform (http://shop.ubrica.com/) for managing the commerce issuing from the retail system.
  • A biomedical industrial city

The retail store, the one-health clinic, the co-operative workshop and e-commerce platform activates the 4th element of health production. We have designed SOHCs to overcome grand challenges in global health. We recognize the critical role of animals, environment, and economy in human health. We believe that sustainable health production in global health is a function of a system that integrates simultaneous operation of these four elements of human health, animal health, environmental health and economic health.

Our SOHCs are rooted in the conception that economic development is the most powerful means of health production. Economic development is the greatest cause of improvement in health.  Economic health, the 4th element of health production, is the primary driver of sustainable one-health in any community in the world. It is common knowledge that compared to a wealthy person a poor person is more likely to get sick; more likely to develop complications of disease; more likely to succumb complications and to develop disability due to disease, and more likely to die from a disease. It is impossible to improve health of a poor person in the long term, without improving the wealth of the person in the long term.
7.1. Fundamental Solution
When we strike a sale at Soko Janja, we divide the proceeds of produce/product sale into three fractions. One fraction goes back to the member, in form of profit. Second fraction goes back to our co-operative to meet operations and administration needs. The third fraction sits in a health fund this is what is called health risk pooling. A member seeking care at a health facility is fully covered. The owners of health facility are happy because they are assured of payment of the quantity and quality of their service offering.
7.1.1. Health risk pooling
Pooling refers to collecting money from many people in a group so that the money collected is then used to pay for health services for its members.   Pooling risks together allows the higher costs of the less healthy to be offset by the relatively lower costs of the healthy. Pooling ensures that the risk related to financing health is borne by all the members of the pool. Its main purpose is to share the financial risk associated with disease, disability and death for which there is uncertain need.

Smith and Witter (2004) explained that there are four classes of risk pooling comprise (a) no risk pool, under which all cost lies with the individual; (b) unitary risk pool, under which all cost is transferred to a single national pool; (c) fragmented risk pools, under which a series of independent risk pools (such as local governments or employer-based pools) are used; and (d) integrated risk pools, under which fragmented risk pools are compensated for the variations in risk to which they are exposed. Small, fragmented risk pools, which are the norm in developing countries, have seriously adverse outcomes for the users of the health system and PSC will help overcome the problem.

7.2.2. Poled Smart Contract

Each individual holder of Ubricoin will receive a smart contract to use health services at a URCC at the time of need Ubric6oin holders who will shop at Soko Janja, practice healthy behaviors will get loyalty point inform of Brevises. The Brevises will go to the pooled smart contract to be used to access health care services in the URCCs. The smart contract will cover preventive and curative services for the holder by the contract. Pooled smart contract will recreate a pooled smart contract (PSC) that will act as health risk pooling.

EMBRACING TELEPRESENCE HEALTH

We all desire easily accessible quality health care in our lives. In most cases patients will seek for medical care during advanced stages of their diseases. The cause being financial strain, distance to the health clinic or transport.

Telehealth can bridge this gap. Telehealth, the remote exchange of data between a patient at home and their clinician(s) through a phone or video conference is a modern form of health care delivery.

According to health research, it is estimated that most visits to the doctor are for simple issues that can be solved with a conversation. There are also times when you are not so sure you need to see a doctor. This can be solved with a simple phone or video call to the doctor.

In the early times, telehealth was done through the telephone. A doctor would diagonise the patient through the telephone, especially in the odd late hours of the night, which saved a lot of time and cost to travel for both parties.

In recent times, we have the wireless communication or video conferencing between the doctor and patient. Telehealth provides solution to those in the rural areas who are unable to access quick transport to the health center. Perfect opportunities for telehealth include the pregnant mother who needs routine monitoring care that is limited in some areas, the elderly, those with children, the disabled and the arising emergency cases.

Telehealth will bring a stop to the unnecessary waiting for hours in the hospital queues which is never enjoyable to any patient, who at some point end-up postponing their appointment with the doctor leading to more harm.

We at Ubrica, will use Ubricoin to implement Ubrica Retail Clinical Centres (URCCs) and community development. Four billion Ubricoins have been set aside for the projects. We shall construct a hundred URCCs which shall be distributed throughout the country.  The URCC system will be remotely connected to the community through a telehealth channel. This will create an extensive network of health infrastructure that will reach everyone in the community. A URCC system with a telehealth network will ensure complete reach of every family in the country, ensuring universal access to health for everyone.

For more updates, please follow us on the links below;

Find Clinical Proceedings from Hospitals of Kenya;

https://jghcs.info/index.php/cphn

For the purpose of engagement, Ubrica world café;

uwc.ubrica.com

Complete KMA Member Satisfaction/ Needs Assessment Survey;

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/7K5GFDY

Join conversation on KMA Telegram group for in-depth updates here;

https://t.me/joinchat/I1wWcki3NO3hlHs_zz9SWg

Join the conversation about Ubricoin on Telegram;

https://web.telegram.org/#/im?p=c1262298390_5891675953416153455

Ubrica Official Discussion Group on Telegram;

https://web.telegram.org/#/im?p=s1208873027_15507959344907715567

 

Author,

Jane M. Jeremiah

6. UBRICA RETAIL CLINICAL CENTERS

Achieving universal health involving ensuring access. Ubrica will build retail clinical centers called Ubrica Retail Clinical Centers (URCCs). We will use the URCC model to organize village level commerce. A URCC will have three primary components: a medical clinic, a retail store, and produce value addition and quality improvement workshop. We intend to support design, development and construction of at least 100 health centers that will be leased to qualifying health professionals on 20 year mortgage agreement. We will construct an average of two units per county in Kenya. Some counties with greater population may have more than two. Each center will have a fully furnished health center and a retail store. A center so designed is the Ubrica Retail Clinical Center (URCC). Individuals enrolled into the CSU form the consumer base of the URCC. Each URCC will serve a catchment population of about 300,000 people. Thus, 100 URCCs will serve at least 30 million people. The URCC project requires US$ 1 billion. We shall allocate 2 billion Ubricoins to fund design, development and implementation of 100 URCCs in Kenya

6.1.           URCCS 2 BILLION UBN

We will sell 2 billion UBNs at $2 per Ubricoin to help in design, development, construction and management of the URCCs. We intend to construct at least 100 health centers average of two units per county. The 2 billion UBNs will be sold in four phases.

6.1.2. The reward system

The aim of creating the URCCs is to build a healthy conscious community. We will use Ubricoins to create an incentive structure to facilitate healthy behaviors. We will issue points to people who:

  • Practice preventive health such as, exercise, proper diet, optimal sleep and early screening of diseases.
  • Basic and secondary prevention of diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and diagnosis checkups

All points earned will go to the pooled smart contract which will be used for paying providers for health services and shopping at Soko Janja.

6.1.1.          Phase 1. Private sale

In this phase we will sell 100 million UBNs. The funds raised will be used for the design of the URCCs.  Desktop research will be carried out to determine the structure and requirements needed to construct the URCCs.  Field research and visiting the sites will be done to determine suitable areas for constructing the URCCs. We will also do environmental studies and acquire permits.

We will also do marketing to create awareness and identify doctors who will be running the clinics. Public outreach and evaluation will be carried out to understand the scope of the project.

User’s research will also be done to determine our target audience and capacity for utilization of health services in each county. User’s studies will include consumers of care, providers of care and payers of care. This will help in determining the optimal number of clinics for each county. Counties with greater population may require more than two URCCs.

We will develop a program for quality training. This will help improve the quality of care that will be provided in the clinics. The identified doctors who will own the clinics will go through continuous professional development. A fraction of the funds raised in this phase, will be used for project planning i.e. getting proper legal document, permits and doing feasibility studies.

6.1.2.        Phase 2. Presale

We will sell 300 billion UBNs in this phase. These funds will be used for the development of URCCs. We will hire consultants, architects, engineers, planners, construction security personnel and IT professionals. This team will be responsible for planning and generating of construction documents for different counties.

6.1.3.        Phase 3. Crowdsale

In this phase, we will sell 1 billion UBNs on October 1, 2019. This will help us in acquisition of land and their title deeds thereof for the implementation of the URCCs project. This land will be sourced from different counties in Kenya. Our goal is to ensure that we at least have land in all the 47 counties so as to effectively start the construction of the URCCs. We will alsoe use these funds to purchase clinical equipment required in the clinics.

6.1.4.        Phase 4. Initial Token Offering

We will sell 600 million UBNs for management of the URCCs. The funds will support mortgages to the doctors who will own the URCCs. The mortgages will make it easy for fresh graduate to own clinics. Some of the funds raised will be used in an incentive program. We will reward health professionals with Brevi for provision of quality of care. We will also issue tokens to individual with good health seeking behaviors. These incentives are meant to improve the quality of care and as motivation to the doctors. Offering token to the patients will lead to early disease detection and prevention of diseases.

Funds raised from this phase will be used for continual growth and maintenance of the clinics and to set stage for long-term success. We will also hire technical teams which will be in charge of maintaining the equipment.

5.4.6. Phase 4. Initial Token Offering

We will sell 400 million coins on December 1, 2018 for scaling Soko Janja. These funds will be used to enroll 14 million households and to pay 7,250 community workers who will be recruited to register manufacturers and suppliers in the 47 counties, 210 sub-counties and 1,450 wards in Kenya.  We will create an incentive program to reward customers who will be buying locally produced products from soko janja.

5.4.5. Phase 3. Crowdsale

We will sell 300 million coins at this stage on October 1, 2018 for developing management capacity. This will include identifying, recruiting, training and retaining human resource for Soko Janja. These funds will be used to organize and upgrade teams into departments. In coordinating to make sure all the teams are working together in a synchronized version so that all the teams will work as a single whole.  We will also create a team controlling financial resources including creating appropriate use of the Ubricoin, token distributions, airdrops and loyalty incentive programs. We will use these funds for strategic planning to scale Soko Janja into a peer to peer market.

5.4.4. Phase 2. Presale

We will sell 200 million UBNs at this stage on August 1, 2018. These funds will be used for the development of Soko Janja. We will buy new computers to facilitate maintenance, updates and development of the platform. These funds will also cater to networking capabilities and paying salaries to people who will be working on the platform. We will also use a fraction of the funds raised to market our platform.

5. HUMAN ENGAGEMENT

We know that a person becomes poor when he or she is unable to exchange his goods or services for currency. When a person cannot find market for his or her products, services or farm produce, he or she ends up being poor. Nearly 95% of people living in Kenya are unable to find market for more than 80% of their farm produce. Kenyan subsistent croppers and pastoralists living in rural areas are extremely impoverished because they cannot find market for their produce. The only available market comes to them in form of organized cartels who buy the farm produce and livestock at a throwaway price. Even at this throwaway price, cartels are only able to purchase less than 20% of all the produce. The rest goes to waste. Perishable produce such as fruits, vegetable, flowers, animal products are rotting away in the villages of Kenya. This extreme waste of produce of the land, kills all possibility of generating wealth for the local people, and multiplies, by several orders of magnitude, the rotting capital in the country (see e.g., de Soto, 2002).

5.2. The Quandary

Without anywhere to sell produce, a subsist cropper or a livestock producer slides into extreme poverty. When sick, she is afraid to seek medical service until the disease advances, and becomes incapacitating. She is forced by worsening disease to seek medical care and arrives at a medical facility without enough money to pay for medical service. Her money does not cover for the medical service offered by the provide at the medical facility. The provider reduces the quality and quantity of service offering to match the little money available from the patient. The problem is that the provider of medical service receives hundreds of patients with advanced disease, but with little or no money. In most cases, the patient cannot pay anything at all. This severe lack of money to pay the providers in Kenya has led to a severe decline in the quality of medical service. Many owners of health facilities have to cut-corners just to make ends meet. Cutting corners by a medical provider means cutting a critical service, increased risk of worsening of disease, medical errors, or introduction of new diseases. Distressed medical providers in Kenya are offering the lowest quality experienced in the world. Low quality medical service is a serious health hazard to the people, which by itself results in death of health consumers in many instances. Health providers are seriously concerned by this problem. Without access to money however, and surrounded by masses of people with advanced disease, they are between a rock and a hard place. This is the quandary of health service.

5.3.          Fundamental solution

Logical reasoning indicates that the fundamental solution to health production problem lies in a system that improves the economy of each individual. In line with this logic, we have created a system to help people find market for their produce, services and products. In order to help a person, he or she must first join and become a member of distributed autonomous organization (DAO) known as the Co-operative Society of Ubricans (CSU). We intend to enroll 14 million families in Kenya alone. Once joined, our community workers help the member to send to market whatever he or she is producing. We have created an online retail store known as Soko Janja (see shop.ubrica.com) where members can buy and sell produce, products, and services. We have started enrolling individuals onto Soko Janja. Enrolled individuals can post pictures of their products, produce and services to the online retail store. Members of the CSU will use their wealth to finance health production for themselves and their loved ones. We will use Ubricoin to facilitate the management of the online store. Ubricoin will also be used at the point of sale in Soko Janja as well as an incentive structure to encourage people to buy from each other to activate local economy.

5.4.          SOKO JANJA 1 BILLION UBNS

We will sell 1 billion UBNs to support our online retail store Soko Janja (see shop.ubrica.com) to help operationalize wealth creation by each individual in any given community. We are proposing to build a platform that will be decentralized. The platform will facilitate peer-to-peer trading without Ubrica mediating. The trading will involve the use of Ubricoin as means of payment which will be validated by blockchain.

5.4.1.        The Reward System

We will create an incentive structure to facilitate peer-to-peer trading and purchase of locally produced products, produce and services. Holders of Ubricoin purchasing locally produced products and services in Soko Janja will receive the services and products at a discount. They will also receive loyalty point for shopping in Soko Janja.

5.4.2.       Reuse of points

Points received from shopping at Soko Janja will be used to access more products, produce and services in the Ubrica ecosystem such as shopping at Soko Janja or access to health services in the URCCs and BMICs

These 1 billion coins will be sold in four phases at $0.5 per UBN.